Category Archives: P-80 Compatibility

Deciphering Reach and RoHS…The Alphabet Soup of Safety Standards

There are many safety standards that apply to chemical products. As new standards and regulations emerge it can be difficult for those who buy and use chemical products to keep up-to-date with proper safety requirements. Many businesses use chemicals in their day to day operations for manufacturing and maintenance. Sometimes it may seem as though the regulations are an alphabet soup of acronyms designed to overwhelm and confuse the average person. Consumers of chemical products rely on manufacturers to comply with all regulations and standards.

RoHS

What is RoHS?
RoHS is an abbreviation for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. Specifically, it restricts the use of certain hazardous materials in electronic products. It is a list of substances that are not permitted in electronics or electrical devices sold in the EU. The RoHS directive applies to all components that are involved in the assembly of electrical products, not solely the finished goods.
What substances are restricted under RoHS?
The following materials are banned under the RoHS directive: lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), hexavalent chromium (CrVI), polybrominated biphenyls (PBB), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), and four different phthalates (DEHP, BBP, BBP, DIBP).

Why is RoHS important?
RoHS compliance is mandatory. The substances banned under RoHS are hazardous to the environment. These substances are also harmful to workers using them during the manufacturing process and consumers that use the finished products.

REACH

What is REACH?
REACH is an abbreviation for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals. REACH is an EU regulation designed to protect human health and the environment from chemical harm. REACH is monitored by ECHA, the European Chemicals Agency.

What substances are restricted under REACH?
REACH applies to all chemical substances, not solely those used in manufacturing or industrial processes. So chemical products used in everyday life, like household cleaning products and paints, home appliances and clothing are also affected. Currently, REACH restricts the use of 38 chemicals, the full list can be found on the ECHA website.

What about SVHC?
SVHC is an abbreviation for Substances of Very High Concern. These substances are put on a candidate list for REACH authorization and are called the REACH SVHC List. This list of substances is updated frequently. The full list of REACH SVHC substances can be found on the ECHA website.
Substances on the REACH SVHC list are:

  • CMR: classified as carcinogenic, mutagenic or reprotoxic (category 1 or 2)
  • PBT: persistent, bio-accumulative and toxic
  • vPvB: Very Persistent and very bio-accumulative
  • substances for which there is evidence for similar concern such as endocrine disruptors

Why is REACH important?
Like RoHS, REACH was enacted to ensure environmental and personal safety when using chemicals.

REACH AND RoHS: How they differ

Both REACH and RoHS are safety regulations designed to protect workers, consumers and the environment. REACH is monitored and implemented by ECHA, while RoHS is an EU directive that is monitored by the individual states. The substances banned by RoHS include a list of 10 specific substances (as of the writing of this post), while those prohibited by REACH keep growing as new hazards are discovered. In general, REACH is much broader in scope than RoHS. In both cases, it is the responsibility of the manufacture to ensure compliance with all regulations.

Manufacturers must continually monitor not only the substances that are restricted by these regulations, but also those under consideration. In some cases, finding a suitable substitute for a banned substance can be very difficult. Compliance for manufacturers is time consuming and expensive, but safety has to be their number one concern.

Safety concerns? IPC has you covered!

As a chemical manufacturer, International Products Corporation (IPC) takes its responsibility to the environment and its customers very seriously. All of IPC’s water-based lubricants and cleaners comply with RoHS and REACH directives, and can replace traditionally used corrosives, phosphates, solvents, petroleum distillates, and other hazardous chemicals. IPC maintains a zero discharge policy and all of its products are developed and manufactured in its Burlington, New Jersey, ISO 9001 certified plant.

IPC is committed to keeping abreast of environmental and regulatory trends and best practices to continually improve the quality and safety of its products and facilities. For more information contact one of IPC’s product specialists.

Stop Struggling … See How Temporary Lubricants Make Rubber Assembly Easier!

Have you ever struggled with rubber assembly? If so, you’ve probably experienced for yourself the excessive force needed to properly install hoses, seals, gaskets, O-rings and many other rubber parts. Wouldn’t it be nice if someone came up with a better way?

Your wishes have been granted! Temporary rubber assembly lubricants were developed specifically to solve this common problem. Temporary rubber lubricants can ease assembly processes and significantly reduce the force needed to assemble rubber parts.

So, how effective are temporary assembly lubricants? Why not see for yourself? International Products Corporation (IPC), manufacturer of P-80® temporary rubber assembly lubricants, put together this short video showing the reduction in force obtained by using P-80® Emulsion to assemble a rubber hose.

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The results of this test are dramatic. A 63% reduction of force was achieved by using P-80 Emulsion for this assembly. A digital force gauge manufactured by Mecmesin was used for measurement. The amount of force needed to assemble a dry piece of hose was 196 Newtons. IPC’s test lab then lubricated the same hose with P-80 Emulsion and the amount of force needed for the same assembly dropped to 72 Newtons. That represents a reduction of force of 124 Newtons or 63%.

What are some of the advantages of reducing the force required to install rubber parts?
• Allow for tighter fitting part design
• Improve product performance
• Increase production rates by allowing for faster assembly
• Reduce worker injuries by decreasing the assembly force required
• Reduce part rejection

The next time you’re having trouble with hoses, seals, gaskets, O-Rings or any other rubber part, remember to use a temporary rubber assembly lubricant and watch the parts slide into place with much less force. Temporary lubricants are ideal for rubber assembly because they reduce the friction needed to assemble parts.

Want more information about temporary rubber assembly lubricants, including how to use them and factors to consider when choosing a lubricant? Contact IPC for help finding the best solution for your assembly needs.

 

Pump Maintenance in 7 Easy Steps

When things are running smoothly it’s easy to overlook common maintenance chores and rationalize that it’s not worth the time to regularly inspect and replace parts. But nothing could be farther from the truth. The reality is that most facilities have several pumps performing a variety of functions that are integral to the successful operationpump-image of the plant. If a pump malfunctions it can be the cause of an entire plant shut down.

Pumps are the cogs in the wheel that keep your facility functioning efficiently, whether they are used for manufacturing processes, HVAC, or water treatment. To keep pumps running properly, a regular maintenance schedule should be implemented and followed.

  1. DETERMINE MAINTENANCE FREQUENCY
    Consult the original manufacturer’s guidelines. Consider the timing to schedule your maintenance. Will lines or pumps have to be disabled? Select a time when the system is down and use common sense when deciding the time and frequency.
  2. OBSERVATION IS KEY
    Get to know your system and make a point to observe your pump while it is still running. Make note of leaks, unusual sounds or vibrations and unusual odors.
  3. SAFETY FIRST
    Make sure machines are properly shut-down before performing your maintenance and/or systems check. Proper isolation is important not only for electrical systems, but for hydraulic systems as well.
  4. MECHANICAL INSPECTION
    1. Check that mounting points are secure
    2. Inspect the mechanical seal and packing
    3. Inspect the pump flanges for leaks
    4. Inspect the couplings
    5. Inspect and clean filters
  5. LUBRICATION
    Lubricate the motor and pump bearing per manufacturer’s guidelines. Be sure not to over lubricate. More bearing damage occurs as a result of over greasing than under greasing. If the bearing has a vent cap, remove the cap and run the pump for 30 minutes before reinstalling cap. This will allow excess grease to work its way out of the bearing.
  6. ELECTRICAL/MOTOR INSPECTION
    1. Check that all terminations are tight
    2. Inspect motor vents and windings for dust/dirt build-up and clean according to manufacturer’s guidelines.
    3. Inspect starter/contractor for arcing, overheating, etc.
    4. Use a megohmmeter on the windings to check for insulation failure
  7. REPLACE DAMAGED SEALS AND HOSES
    If any hoses, seals, or O-rings show wear or damage, replace immediately. Using a temporary rubber assembly lubricant will ensure a tight fit and prevent leaks or slips.

International Products Corporation (IPC) offers a unique line of temporary rubber lubricants. Our P-80® lubricants are available in six water-based formulagroup-p-80s that offer superior lubrication and are compatible with a variety of surfaces. P-80 lubricants are environmentally friendly, most are biodegradable.
There are numerous lubricants out there, including good old soap and water, so why do you need specially formulated rubber lubricants?  The facts speak for themselves:

P-80 Lubricants

  • Reduces Friction by 70%
  • Provides superior temporary lubrication, is environmentally friendly, is safe for workers, and comes in many biodegradable formulas

Solvents

  • Reduces Friction by 30%
  • Provides poor lubrication, contains high VOCs, may be flammable, and poses possible health risks

Soaps and Detergents

  • Reduces Friction by 30%
  • Provides inconsistent, nominal lubrication and may reactivate when wet

Petroleum Distillates

  • Reduces Friction by 60%
  • Provides sustained lubrication
  • Often incompatible with materials
  • Leaves a heavy residue

P-80 rubber lubricants are temporary, once dry the lubrication ceases and parts stay in place. Additionally, these lubricants will not reactivate in the presence of water and they will not dry out rubber parts.

Keep your facilities running smoothly. Try P-80 temporary rubber assembly lubricants for your pump maintenance needs. Visit http://www.ipcol.com to speak with a specialist and request a sample for testing. Download our free ePaper and case study discussing P-80 for pump seal maintenance.

All P-80 products are manufactured in the USA by International Products Corporation (IPC) and are readily available worldwide through a network of global distributors.
Contact IPC for a free P-80® sample kit by visiting www.ipcol.com or email parts@ipcol.com.  P-80 is available for purchase online at www.ipcol.com.

International Products Corporation Exhibits at Made In New Jersey Day

International Products Corporation (IPC) was one of 28 hand-picked exhibitors at the New Jersey Business & Industry Association (NJBIA) sponsored “Made in New Jersey Day” held on March 21, 2013 at the State House in Trenton, NJ.

Judy Shapiro, Sales and Marketing representative and IPC President, Kathy Wyrofsky display products manufactured by company.

Judy Shapiro, Sales and Marketing representative and IPC President, Kathy Wyrofsky display products manufactured by company.

NJBIA’s Made in New Jersey Day is a celebration of New Jersey’s manufacturing industry, featuring 28 manufacturers from throughout the state displaying their products in the halls of the State Capitol. This event provides local manufacturers the opportunity to highlight the contributions manufacturing makes to the state’s economy. Participants are able to engage in meaningful discussions with other NJ based manufacturers, state legislative leaders and policy makers, and the news media.  “It’s always interesting to see what other companies are making in New Jersey and to discuss their successes and challenges. It’s also a great opportunity to discuss State business policy with legislators one-on-one.” says President, Kathy Wyrofsky, who attended this year.

About International Products Corporation:
Founded in 1923, IPC specializes in the manufacture and distribution of environmentally-friendly temporary assembly lubricants and precision cleaners at their ISO 9001-Certified facility in Burlington, New Jersey. Their state-of-the-art manufacturing, packaging, and warehousing facility is equipped with an on-site laboratory for analytical work and consultation on assembly and cleaning processes.

All of IPC’s products are manufactured in Burlington New Jersey and are readily available worldwide through their network of global distributors. For more information or free samples, visit http://www.ipcol.com or call 609-386-8770.

Tips on using P-80 Temporary Rubber Assembly Lubricant

P-80 is very simple to use.  All that is required is that enough of the liquid be applied to the part to create a thin film over its surface.  This can be done manually or automatically with a bath, brush, spray, sponge or squirt technique.  The best approach is determined by the size of the piece and the nature of the task.  Be sure to shake or stir P-80 well before using to assure maximum effectiveness.

If you need to cut rubber by hand or machine, apply P-80 to the knife blade and/or the rubber itself.  Cut the rubber while the surfaces are still wet.  Because P-80 keeps rubber from squirming, it allows clean, straight cutting.  Your cuts will be more precise, and you’ll waste less material.

Have questions or want free P-80 samples? 
Telephone: 609-386-8770  Fax: 609-386-8438  Web: www.ipcol.com Email: mkt@ipcol.com