Tag Archives: auto assembly

How to Open and Dispense From a Drum in 7 Easy Steps

Why Buy Drums?
For companies that use large amounts of liquid products, ordering drums makes sense. Buying one drum, rather than numerous smaller containers, can be a more economical way to purchase liquid chemicals such as Specialty Cleaners and Temporary Assembly Lubricants. Cost savings may be realized in reductions in product cost, packaging cost, and shipping cost.

What’s the Correct Way to Open a Drum?
There are a variety of different drums on the market and a wide array of drum manufacturers, so it’s always a good idea to follow the best operating procedures for the particular type of container in your possession. At International Products Corporation (IPC) we use sturdy, yet lightweight, plastic drums for our products. Our customers often ask us for easy methods of opening and dispensing products from drums. We recommend using either a pump or the faucet that is attached to each drum. Watch our detailed videos for step by step instructions for both methods or follow the guidelines below.

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Opening a Drum and Dispensing with a Pump

  1. Remove caps and bung seals
  2. Choose the correct bung for your pump – either a fine/ NPT thread or a course buttress
  3. Insert pump into bung opening
  4. Use pump to mix the product
  5. Dispense product into a container
  6. Remove pump
  7. Replace drum bungs for storage

Opening a Drum and Dispensing with a Faucet

  1. Remove caps and bung seals
  2. Loosen upper bung for air
  3. Screw faucet into the other bung
  4. Face faucet toward dolly and tilt drum onto dolly
  5. Dispense with faucet into container
  6. Close faucet and vent
  7. Replace drum bungs and stand container upright for storage

Check out IPC’s series of “How-To” videos for other helpful tips on using Specialty Cleaners and Temporary Assembly LubricantsContact IPC’s technical team to help you find the best solution for your assembly or precision cleaning needs.

The Best Solution for Easy Automotive Rubber Assembly

There are an amazing number of rubber parts in a single automobile. It can be mindboggling to think of the various rubber components that are involved in the assembly of a car. O-rings, bushings, seals, hoses, engine mounts, belts, gaskets…any number of chassis, engine and suspension components are made of rubber or plastic. 

Rubber is naturally slip resistant, making it difficult to work with at times. Trying to install, remove or manipulate tight fitting rubber components can be a real challenge. Parts that are improperly aligned or installed may result in performance or safety issues. Using a temporary assembly lubricant, like P-80®, makes rubber installation easier and helps to avoid these types of problems.

P-80 temporary rubber assembly lubricants are designed to decrease the installation force needed to install rubber parts. P-80 lubricants enable rubber parts to slide easily into place with minimal force. Once dry, P-80 stops lubricating and parts remain in place, resulting in a tight fit. Since P-80 does not contain silicon or any other persistent ingredients, once dry the slipping action goes away.

P-80 is used by many automotive OEM’s, suppliers and repair shops to ease the force needed to install rubber parts such as bushings, hoses, O-rings, belts and gaskets. Some common automotive applications are illustrated here:

P-80 lubricants work so well for automotive assembly applications that the full line of P-80 lubricants was awarded with the 2012 North American Automotive Assembly Lubricants Product Leadership Award by Frost & Sullivan. Read the full report here.

The next time you’re having trouble pushing a hose into place, inserting a window seal or installing suspension bushings try using P-80 lubricants and see how much easier the job becomes. Temporary lubricants are ideal for automotive use because they reduce the friction needed for assembly and repair without damaging the parts.

Want more information about temporary rubber assembly lubricants, including how to use them and factors to consider when choosing a lubricant?  Download IPC’s free P-80® webinar.  Want to try P-80 for your automotive assembly needs?  Request a free sample. Or contact our technical team to help you find the best solution for your assembly needs.

Have you Tried P-80 for Automotive Assembly?

P-80 temporary rubber lubricants have been proven effective for a wide range of automotive assembly operations.  P-80 lubricants are a great aid for the installation of boots, bumpers, bushings, diaphragms, grommets, hoses, insulators, mounts, O-rings, plugs, rubber moldings, seals, sleeves, tires, rubber washers, wire harnesses, and hundreds of other rubber and soft plastic parts.Automotive Assembly Applications

What are your most successful automotive applications for P-80?  What assembly challenges are you facing?

Join us at Engine Expo 2012 – USA Novi Michigan

P-80 Temporary Rubber Assembly Lubricants - tube sizesInternational Products is on the road again! If you live in the Michigan area, stop by the Engine Expo 2012 at The Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi Michigan. Show dates are Tuesday October 23rd through Thursday October 25th, 2012. Our booth number is E322.

P-80 temporary rubber assembly lubricants are used to reduce friction and increase safety on the installation of rubber and plastic parts – including; belts, bumpers, seals, gaskets. grommets, bushings, O-rings, tires and hoses.

Be sure to stop by and pick up free samples of P-80. View real-life applications and try it for yourself! For more product information, or to request a sample, visit us at www.ipcol.com

If you haven’t registered for the conference already – follow this link for details http://www.engine-expo.com/usa/

Hope to see you there!

Automotive Assembly Applications

P-80 temporary rubber lubricants have been proven effective for a wide range of assembly operations involving boots, bumpers, bushings, diaphragms, grommets, hoses, insulators, mounts, O-rings, plugs, rubber moldings, seals, sleeves, tires, rubber washers, wire harnesses, and hundreds of other rubber and soft plastic parts.

What are your most successful automotive applications of P-80?  What assembly challenges are you facing?